Tag Archives: Seth Godin

And then a harder challenge…

Seth’s course continues with him speaking, giving examples, explaining concepts and exhorting… I am not going to go through everything he suggested (do the course! I urge you… do the course! Seth Godin’s Freelancer course) but I will give some ideas of the challenges in the exercises, what they made me think about, and some of my answers.

The next questions Seth posed (as exercises 2 and 3) are really thought provoking:

  • What do people buy when they buy something from you?
  • Leave out the easy, repetitive, generic stuff… what are you doing that’s difficult?

This really got me thinking, because, the easy answer is “consultancy and training,” but… what do I mean by that? What exactly do people want to buy from me? My engagements with customers don’t necessarily offer concrete deliverables – although they can do. I’m not providing wedding catering, or photography,  where people can see something they have bought. What I offer could seem quite nebulous. The type of feedback I have had from satisfied customers (especially senior people like CEOs) are words like “happier because you are here,” “calmer days,” “more confidence”.  This requires some thinking – what are people buying, really, when they buy from me? This is not about what I think I am selling, but about what other people think they are buying.

What do people buy when they buy something from me?

I provide consultancy, training, coaching, mentoring in my specialist areas within IT. That is software quality management, software testing and user experience testing.

Therefore people buy my expertise and knowledge.

More specifically, if YOU buy from ME: you buy my confidence, energy and enthusiasm, my ability to enthuse others. You buy my diligence, my competence, my ability to find out or synthesise new things from a set of information / data and therefore suggest a (new to you) solution to a problem that you have.

You buy the knowledge that you can trust me, because I am a professional.

Leave out the easy, repetitive, generic stuff… what am I doing that’s difficult?

The difficult parts of my role, the reason I succeed, is because of two contrasting areas: People and Data.

Most of the problems I encounter in organisations, and help to solve, arise from gaps in people’s communication, understanding and skills. I’m an enabler and teacher. I enable others to become more confident and to learn new skills, both technical and interpersonal. After time with me, you’ll have bought the ability to close those communication gaps.

Data arrives on organisation’s laps in vast and unmanageable clumps. I have the ability, the patience and a certain enjoyment in unravelling data, analysing it, researching, thinking, synthesising, making data into information. Ideas arising from this work are often hard to explain and convey, but I have a skill in transferring and clarifying concepts via story-telling and metaphor. After time with me, you’ll have bought knowledge you’ve gained from those stories.

Here are ten things you’ll get from me, if you are my client:

  1. Trustworthiness – if I say I’ll do it, then I’ll do it.
  2. Kindness and respect – I’ll treat people as people.
  3. Diligence and hard work – you won’t wonder whether I could have done more.
  4. Honesty in feedback – I won’t flatter, I will critique, and I’ll praise
  5. Enthusiasm and positive attitude – I will look for ways to make things work.
  6. Stories and metaphors – I’ll seek many ways to explain and transfer ideas.
  7. Listening and understanding – I will take time to make communication two-way.
  8. Timeliness and scheduling – I will work to get things done ahead of date.
  9. Confidence and worth – I want to leave you feeling more capable than I found you.
  10. Sharing and giving – I want to transfer to you the knowledge I have.

Rank yourself…

Then came a really hard question, but one that I found important to reflect on really carefully. How do I rank, against others, against myself as I used to be, and against what I could be in the future? Seth asked: “Compared to others who do what you do, rank yourself on reputation, knowledge, expertise, tools, handiness”

So, how do I compare? And, who do I compare myself to?

I took a long hard look at my skills and expertise. There are some areas where I have specialised, practised, and continue to grow. There are other areas which are no longer my specialism. It’s like spring cleaning a cupboard – what do I want to keep? what do I want to mend? and what do I throw away? As I continue to specialise, it is clearly impossible to know everything.

Then, I reflected again on all the earlier exercises.

  • What are people buying from me? Have I the expertise and skills to offer those things? Yes, I do.
  • My most important skills and knowledge – am I nurturing those well enough? Probably, but still, I made a plan for professional development, focusing on the things that are important
  • Where I have neglected a skill and got rusty, are those skills still relevant? Probably not, so I need to decide whether I revisit them or not.

Lots to do, lots to learn. Even if I was completely satisfied with myself, the world around me changes and I need to keep up to date.

Next: Fear, selling and tiptoeing through the marketplace….

2017 – a new year, and the start of something good

I’ve started 2017 by working on Seth Godin’s Freelancer course.  Of, course, I have worked for myself for a long time, on and off, but this time, I really want to work in a way that maximises the good effect I know I can have, if I put my mind to it. Following on from GTAC and other experiences last year, I want to find myself and flourish this year – in my work and in my personal life.

I like Seth’s blog, so, let’s see what he can say that helps.

The course starts with a series of quick lectures to camera from Seth with some immediate ideas about WHY one might wish to freelance, and some characteristics: “A freelancer is a warrior without a king”. I listen, watch and take notes.

And then, the first exercise. Seth challenges the student to think about 6 questions about their desired freelance career, and answer these (reasonably) publicly – blog or facebook. So – here goes!

The six questions are:

  • What do I want to do?
  • Who do I want to change and how?
  • How much risk will I take?
  • How much work will I do?
  • Does the work matter?
  • Is it possible?

The first challenge from Seth…

What do I want to do?

My work, my purpose, is to enable individuals, teams and organisations provide software products and services that truly delight and enhance the world.

I want to build and use my talents and skills as a teacher, story teller, mentor and coach, to enable others to provide those beautiful software experiences.

Enhancing and using my talents and skills as a quality management, testing and user experience (UX) practitioner, will allow me to enable others to provide those beautiful software experiences.

Analytical, cognitive and emotional skills that I have, need to be maintained, enhanced and nurtured, so that in research I can find and share evidence of what is required to provide those beautiful software experiences to people within software teams, in order that they might share them in their own work.

In order to do this I want to cover some specific work, not being done elsewhere (as far as I know)

  • Carry out research on the UX of testing tools and provide evidence and guidelines of what is required to improve them, leading to an improved tool set for testers
  • Speak, write, teach, mentor, coach and advise people in software teams about quality, UX and testing
  • Take part in projects, demonstrating by my own practise the ideas I am advocating.

Who do I want to change and how?

Organisations, teams and individuals who are designing, building, testing and delivering software products and services.

How do I want to change them? By changing their attitudes to UX, making it an essential rather than optional part of their delivery. By enabling them to provide a beautiful UX, and giving them permission to use the methods and techniques they need. By broadening the industry’s understanding of quality.

How will I do that? By providing coaching, teaching, support, and guidance. By example in my own work. By providing evidence of the current status of UX and what is required. By story-telling, performing, writing, and teaching.

How much risk will I take?

I have already stepped off the cliff, and I am gliding. I have already taken risks: personal, financial. This is it, this is the thing I want to do.

I need to make sure I have a home, food and other essentials. But I need to fly.

Risk: a 6 to 8, out of 10 is what I am prepared for and am taking.

How much work will I do?

My world needs to be balanced, rounded. It needs to contain things other than work. So, this will take diligence, enthusiasm, dedication. It will be hard work, especially to learn new things. I can see myself spending 50-60 hours a week on this.

I need to allow time for all the balance of yoga, meditation, sewing, walking, reading, gardens, and the other things that recreate myself. I need to allow time for friends and family.

Does the work matter?

Yes. Although I did not get funding from the WII application that I did last year, the feedback said the idea of investigating UX for test tools was potentially a game changer, and ground breaking. The feedback also said this is at a research stage. So, the research project is vital as a next step. I need to find a place/way to base the research so it is well founded and leads to useful results.

Is it possible?

Yes.

  • There are others successfully offering consultancy in quality, testing and UX (but as separate subjects)
  • There are others researching into the UX of other tools used in software development and support – test tools is in a gap between research

This is not outlandish, but it is new.

 

Coming soon: what Seth challenged me to do next… and whether I succeeded…